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Grubaugh Law, Law Blog

CLE Course on preparing an executive for testimony

To anyone interested, I’m teaching a continuing legal education (CLE) course for the Federal Bar Association tomorrow at 1pm EST. The course is called: Facing the Fire: How Executives Can Best Prepare to Testify in Legal Proceedings. The course… Read More
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Categories: Firm News

A win at the Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims

Grubaugh Law won another case at the Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims (CAVC). This was a fully contested and hard fought appeal. The case now goes back to the Board of Veterans Appeals on remand, where the veteran may be awarded service-connectio… Read More
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Categories: Uncategorized

Instructional error in Gomes

The Connecticut Supreme Court released a decision yesterday, Gomes, that overturned an assault conviction due to a jury charge. The defense asked for a jury instruction on the adequacy of the police investigation. The police responded to a fight at a… Read More
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The NDAA adds three new presumptive service-connected diseases

The Senate overrode President Trump’s veto of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) yesterday. Combined with the House’s earlier veto override, the bill is now law. The NDAA contains good news for Vietnam era veterans, with a prov… Read More
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Defense objections to preservation requests

Orin Kerr, 4th Amendment scholar, has a new article arguing defense attorneys should object to the government’s preservation requests under 18 U.S.C. § 2703(f). Under 18 U.S.C. § 2703(f), Internet providers must preserve records and other evi… Read More
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Categories: Uncategorized

Connecticut Supreme Court overturns murder conviction because the judge uncritically admitted ballistic evidence

Today, the Connecticut Supreme Court overturned the murder conviction of Donald Raynor because the trial judge denied the defendant’s motion for a hearing pursuant to State v. Porter, 241 Conn. 57 (1997). Porter follows Daubert v. Merrell Dow P… Read More
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The Army Discharge Review Board Must Take into Account Mental-Health Issues

I sometimes blog over at Global Military Justice Reform Blog. I wrote one this morning about a settlement out of the U.S. District Court in Connecticut, between the Army and veterans with bad-paper discharges. Read More
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CAAF's Textual Interpretation of the Good-Faith Doctrine was Short-Lived.

When the Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces (CAAF) decided U.S. v. Hoffman in 2015, it signaled a potential shift in the application of the good-faith doctrine. In Hoffman, base authorities arrested Appellant, suspecting him of driving around post… Read More
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Categories: Military Justice

United States v. White, and the Good-Faith Exception

The Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces (CAAF), decided U.S. v. White, on November 9, 2020. In White, the military judge suppressed evidence of child pornography, finding no probable cause. The military judge also found the good-faith exception did… Read More
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Categories: Military Justice

Kent State and Following Orders

In various forums, there’s been debate about the suitability of the Orders Project. CAAFlog shared a post from retired Major General Charles Dunlap, the former deputy judge advocate general of the Air Force, where he argued the project was unne… Read More
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Categories: Military Justice

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